Advocacy

Bolivia: The impact of a mine on a community’s women

November 1, 2012
by 
Mary Durran, Latin America Programs Officer

These days, things are booming in the mining town of Huanuni, Bolivia. Tin prices are at nearly $10 a pound, compared to $2 in the eighties. The tin extracted from the mine is processed in local foundries, and then sent by boat to Asia, where it ends up in cell phones, laptops, iPods and other electrical goods. Miners are earning unprecedented salaries, which has spawned a tin rush that has men literally fighting for jobs at the COMIBOL state run mine, and young women fighting over the wage-earning miners.

Starting Out a New Campaign: Group by Group

October 31, 2012
by 
Luke Stocking, Deputy Director, In Canada Programs

Development and Peace has always aspired to be a democratic movement attentive to the voice of its members. These members are the living witness of our Catholic faith, put in the service of International Development.

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Seeing firsthand the effects of mining in Peru

October 11, 2012
by 
Mary Durran, Latin America Programs Officer

The road from Lima to Huancayo, in the central Highlands of Peru, is a dusty and graffiti-streaked highway that climbs, at first slowly, out of a grey, mist-shrouded Lima. It is flanked by settlements of poor neighbourhoods, where pastel-coloured ramshackle houses are precariously perched on the mountainside, looking down on to a four-lane highway.

Many communities affected by mining in Peru

October 5, 2012
by 
Mary Durran, Latin America Programs Officer

Yesterday, I flew to South America to attend a workshop that is being organized by CIDSE, and the Canadian Network for Corporate Accountability (CNCA), along with a number of Latin American civil society organizations, on how transnational corporations can be more vigilant with respect to human rights – i.e. take steps to ensure that their operations do not lead to human rights violations and damage to local communities.

Peasant killed and five others wounded as Land Related Violence Spikes in the Lower Aguan, Honduras

August 1, 2012

Israel Garcia Perez, a member of an Aguan peasant group, was found dead, with bullet wounds marking his body,  early morning Saturday July 28th, at the Los Laureles property on the outskirts of Tocoa. His death brought to 52 the number of peasants violently killed in this region in less than 3 years. Israel Garcia Perez had been participating in a land occupation on lands claimed by African palm oil magnate Miguel Facusse, whose security guards are implicated in several executions in the region.

Black Out Speak Out

June 7, 2012
by 
Mayalène Lavigne-Martel, Online Outreach Officer

On June 4th, Development and Peace, in solidarity with 500 other organizations, participated in the Black Out Speak Out campaign in opposition to Bill C-38 which threatens Canada’s environment and democracy.

As part of the campaign, we blacked out our website for an entire day, changed the profile picture on our Facebook account and tweeted at #BLACKOUTSPEAKOUT.

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Archbishop in Peru threatened for calling for responsible environmental regulation of smelter

March 14, 2012
by 
Mary Durran, International Programs Officer for Latin America
Archbishop Barreto of Huancayo, Peru

On March 2nd, 2012, Archbishop Pedro Jimeno Barreto of Huancayo and his team, received anonymous death threats for opposing the re-opening of a US owned polymetallic smelter in the city of La Oroya.

Carbon Offsets worsening a Human Rights Crisis in the Lower Aguan, Honduras

February 28, 2012
by 
Mary Durran, International Programs Officer for Latin America
Local people remembering the victims of human rights violations

For most people, the mention of the Kyoto Protocol does not evoke an association with the tropical lowlands of Honduras, nor with human rights abuses.

Yet Development and Peace’s Honduran partner, the Popol Nah Tun Foundation, come face to face every day with an unpleasant and less well known facet of the Kyoto Protocol – the Clean Development Mechanism, an important component of the global carbon trading market.

Honduran partners mobilize against new mining law

January 26, 2012
by 
Mary Durran, International Programs Officer for Latin America

A few months after the conclusion of controversial negotiations between Canada and Honduras on a Free Trade Agreement, the Honduran Congressional Committee on Mining announced on January 16th that a new Mining Bill has just been concluded and is to be debated in Congress.

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