Honduras

The lives of human rights defenders in Latin America at risk

On January 7th, 2016, Nilce Magalhães de Souza disappeared from her home, never to be seen again. Nicinha, as she was known locally, was a leader in the Movement of People Affected by Dams (MAB) in Brazil, which is a Development and Peace partner. She was actively protesting against the Jirau Hydroelectric Plant in the northern province of Rondônia in the Amazon.

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There needs to be justice for the brutal assassination of environmentalist Berta Cáceres in Honduras

Development and Peace adds its voice to those of its Honduran partners in the unequivocal condemnation of the abhorrent assassination of Berta Cáceres, president of Coordinating Group of the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH), in the early hours of March 2nd, 2016.

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In Honduras, the CEHPRODEC calls for solidarity with the threatened Lenca people of Marcala

February 11, 2016
by 
Mary Durran, Latin America Programs Officer

Two months after the COP 21 climate talks in Paris, where countries agreed to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions, in the German city of Bonn, the G8 nations are pressed to increase their contributions to the Green Climate Fund in order to finance mitigation and adaptation projects in the particularly vulnerable nations of the Global South.

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Au Honduras, le CEHPRODEC appelle à la solidarité avec le peuple Lenca à Marcala qui vit sous la menace permanente

February 11, 2016
by 
Mary Durran, chargée de programmes pour l'Amérique latine

Deux mois après les négociations sur le climat qui ont eu lieu à Paris, lors de la COP21, les États ont convenu de réduire de manière significative leurs émissions de gaz à effet de serre.

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Honduras : protéger une précieuse source d’eau menacée par un barrage

July 4, 2014
by 
Mary Durran, chargée de programmes pour l'Amérique latine

La petite ville de San Francisco est nichée entre les montagnes bleues couronnées de nuages, les forêts tropicales verdoyantes du parc national Pico Bonito et les plaines fertiles, productrices de fruits, de la côte atlantique nord du Honduras. Une ancienne bananeraie qui longe le parc a cédé la place à des ananas destinés à l’exportation. Dans cette localité, personne ne souffre de la faim — même les chiens et les chats errants semblent bien nourris —, mais les soins de santé sont précaires et les emplois sont rares.

Honduras: Protecting a precious water source threatened by a dam

July 4, 2014
by 
Mary Durran, Latin America Programs Officer

The small town of San Francisco is nestled between the blue cloud-wrapped mountains and verdant tropical forests of the Pico Bonito National Park, and the sultry fruit-producing plains of the northern Atlantic coast of Honduras. A former banana plantation that borders the park has been replaced by pineapples for export. It is a community where no one goes hungry – even the stray dogs and cats look well-fed – but healthcare is precarious and jobs are few. Many youth have migrated to the US in search of opportunities.

Honduras - Trade and Investment at the Expense of Human Rights

November 21, 2013
by 
Mary Durran, Latin America Programs Officer

In the run up to general elections in Honduras on November 24, Development and Peace has challenged the government of Canada for signing the Canada-Honduras Free Trade Accord (FTA).

Video: Honduras and Peru: The right to free, prior and informed consent

November 18, 2013
by 
Mayalène Lavigne-Martel, Online Outreach Officer

The governments of Honduras and Peru award concessions to mining companies. Villages are displaced, fields and streams are contaminated and the communities have no say. Even so, they are demanding one thing: that their right to free, prior and informed consent be respected.

Honduras: New laws put communities at a disadvantage

April 19, 2013
by 
Mary Durran, Latin America Programs Officer

The people of the Siria Valley in Honduras may have breathed a sigh of relief in 2010 with the closure of the Canadian-owned San Martin gold mine that sits in their midst, but now they must brace themselves for further environmental destruction and depletion of their water supply. In mid-January, after two years of negotiations and opposition from civil society, a new mining law was finally approved by the Honduran Congress.

Honduras: “We are not stealing or begging – we are demanding what is rightfully ours.”

April 18, 2013
by 
Mary Durran, Latin America Programs Officer
Fernando is the group leader of the Indigenous Lenca Movement of La Paz, who are trying to reclaim their land.

In Honduras’ mountainous southern department of La Paz, mornings are chilly and the altitude is ideal for coffee growing. Here, the dark-skinned indigenous Lenca people make up 80% of the population. Yet, from the poverty and the discrimination they endure, one might think they were a minority.

In this community, four out of ten children die before they reach the age of two from a poverty-related disease. Most of the girls become pregnant while still minors, and in the community of Santa Elena alone, eleven women died last year in childbirth.