Sahel

In Niger, an ocher landscape tinged with green in the middle of the Sahel

August 12, 2014
by 
Stéphane Vinhas

We are travelling down a paved road in western Niger, on our way to the village of Garbay Tombo, which is participating in a project being spearheaded by Caritas Niamey. The horizon is ocher, dotted with greenery. There are trees scattered here and there and shoots of millet struggling to emerge from the ground, hampered in their efforts by the absence of regular rainfall. On the side of the road, a herd of magnificently horned cattle are lumbering along slowly, laboriously, in the sweltering heat. They head to a muddy water hole where they can slake their thirst.

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Many remain vulnerable to hunger in the Sahel

July 9, 2014
by 
Khoudia Ndiaye, Communications Officer
Domo Damani and her granddaughter trek home after visiting a Caritas centre in Niger

Two years after the serious humanitarian crisis that affected 16 million people in the Sahel region of West Africa, Development and Peace remains on alert. In 2013, the situation improved slightly, but the harvest was still not plentiful enough to fill the gaps, and the ongoing conflict in Mali continued to destabilize the population. Thousands of vulnerable families are still confronted with hunger and growing poverty.

Bring A New Leaf to your home town!

June 5, 2013
by 
Kelly Di Domenico, Communications Officer

A few months ago, we had the pleasure of premiering Salt+Light’s documentary A New Leaf, about the food crisis in the Sahel region of West Africa in several cities across Canada. These premiere events brought out hundreds of people who wanted to learn more about this little known part of the world and how as Canadians we can make a difference. In only a mere 30 minutes, audience members felt a connected solidarity with those whose stories spanned across the screen.

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Don't Miss A New Leaf!

March 8, 2013
by 
Kelly Di Domenico, Communications Officer
Image from the new documentary A New Leaf

Last week, Development and Peace sponsored a series of premieres of the new Salt and Light documentary A New Leaf, which features the response of Development and Peace to the food crisis in the Sahel region of West Africa, in five Canadian cities across the country.

A New Leaf: the show is on the road!

February 27, 2013
by 
Suzanne Slobodian, Fundraising Officer, Major Gifts and Planned Giving

We just launched our "Cross Canada Tour" (5 cities) Monday night in Ottawa and it was with a lot of pride that Mgr Terrence Prendergast (Archbishop of Ottawa) hosted the premiere of the documentary A New Leaf. Mgr Prendergast made the opening remarks of the one-hour panel discussion following the film screening. The hundred participants had the opportunity to ask all their questions to our guests: Fr.

A New Leaf: A timely reminder that a crisis does not just disappear

February 27, 2013
by 
Kelly Di Domenico, Communications Officer

This summer, I travelled to Niger and Mali to report on the food crisis that was gripping the Sahel region of West Africa, as well as the impact that political instability in Mali was having on the population. Accompanying me for the Niger part, was a crew from Salt and Light Television, who we had invited to come to document how the population was coping and our response. Together, we visited villages where the threat of hunger was a daily struggle. We also visited a refugee camp for Malians fleeing the violence in their own country. We could see the despondency of the people in the camp, having been completely uprooted from their homes and without any real idea as to when they would be able to return, if ever. It was a journey of discovery for all of us, and I was anxious to see how this story would be told in the documentary.

Mali Emergency: Development and Peace is supporting Caritas in the Sahel

February 26, 2013
by 
Khoudia Ndiaye, Communications Officer
CADEV - Caritas Niger - staff with Malian refugees

The ongoing conflict in Mali is the result of a complex series of events in which each player has defended their own interests. Secessionist ambitions, control of natural resources, the imposition of sharia, are all claims raised by a variety of national and international actors. After launching a military offensive in early January 2013, French troops supported by African troops have now taken control of almost the entire territory, but the instability persists.

More than 300 000 displaced persons

Mali: growing number of refugees in neighbouring countries

January 30, 2013
by 
Khoudia Ndiaye, Communications Officer
The refugees are arriving in one of the most arid parts of Burkina Faso. They’ve arrived with nothing. They need food, shelter, medical care and fuel. Photo: Simone Stefanelli/Caritas

According to figures from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, more than 7,500 Malians have fled their country in the last two weeks. The intensification of fighting has compelled entire families, some of them in car or truck, others on foot or on the backs of donkeys, to seek refuge in neighbouring countries (mainly in Niger, Burkina Faso and Mauritania).

In Mali, hundreds of thousands of people threatened by clashes

January 16, 2013
by 
Khoudia Ndiaye, Communications Officer
Newly arrived Malian refugees in Niger wait for registration and for their first food rations. Photo: Ryan Worms/Caritas Internationalis

The French military intervention currently taking place in Mali has been making headlines. Although supported by the vast majority of Malians, it also carries with it the risk of worsening the humanitarian situation for the population, especially for those in the North. The 200,000 people still living in this area are now even more affected by the state of emergency, as declared by President Dioncounda Traoré. "I fear for the people of the North today. We know that this population is in a very precarious situation.

Sowing the seeds of solidarity

October 23, 2012
by 
Josianne Gauthier, Deputy Executive Director and Guy Des Aulniers, Program Officer for Emergency Relief

Apparently, it is never too early to teach the concept of solidarity, nor does it have to be difficult. When the Director of our 3-year-old boy’s daycare informed me that she intended to put together an awareness-building project on Africa for the 2-5 year-olds and that the exercise would culminate in a fundraising activity in support of our West Africa appeal, I was both moved and surprised.

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